Preschoolers have a lot of energy, which they use in a more organized way than when they were toddlers. Instead of just running around in the backyard, a preschooler has the physical skills and coordination to ride a tricycle or chase a butterfly.

Preschoolers are also discovering what it means to play with a friend instead of just alongside another child, as toddlers do. By being around other kids, a preschooler gains important social skills, such as sharing and taking turns. Despite occasional conflicts, preschoolers learn to cooperate and interact during play.

Helping Kids Learn New Skills
Preschoolers develop important motor skills as they grow. New skills your preschooler might show off include hopping, jumping forward, catching a ball, doing a somersault, skipping, and balancing on one foot. Help your child practice these skills by playing and exercising together.

When you go for a walk, your preschooler may complain about being tired but most likely is just bored. A brisk walk can be dull for young kids, so try these tips to liven up your family stroll:

Make your walk a scavenger hunt by giving your child something to find, like a red door, a cat, a flag, and something square.
Sing songs or recite nursery rhymes while you walk.
Mix walking with jumping, racing, hopping, and walking backwards.
Make your walk together a mathematical experience as you emphasize numbers and counting: How many windows are on the garage door? What numbers are on the houses?
These kinds of activities are fun and also help to prepare kids for school.